by Sarah Mann, MD

“Let food be thy medicine and medicine be thy food.”

Hippocrates

…said Hippocrates, the ancient Greek physician, and he became the founder of medicine.

But a lot has changed since 460 BC and our relationship with food has been dramatically modified over and over again since that ancestral diet perspective.

We turn to food to feel better, to look better, to do better, to find comfort and relief.

So we tend to turn to food a lot, for an abundance of reasons beyond actual hunger.

And then we go on a quest for the most efficient, scientifically-backed diet plan, to get back in shape and do some damage control.

We tried the Mediterranean Diet, with the good-old virgin olive oil and lots of seasonal, plant based recipes, a little meat and moderate amounts of dairy to improve our heart health.

We tested Atkins determined to eat more protein and fewer carbs, to lose weight and change our metabolism to burn stored fat for energy.

Then we explored the benefits of The Zone to maintain an ideal ratio of protein to carbs without the dreadful calorie counting, and reduce diet induced inflammation.

The South Beach diet taught us how to categorize carbohydrates and fats as “good” or “bad” and emphasize on eating high-fiber, low-glycaemic carbohydrates, unsaturated fats, and lean protein, but the long-term safety of this diet has not been established and we moved on to Vegetarianism which abstains from the consumption of meat but allows dairy and eggs, or we went Vegan and avoided all animal products whatsoever, before turning to the very trendy Ketogenic diet which allows a high consumption of fats, and then turns them into ketones in the liver, to improve insulin sensitivity and cause fat loss.

The most beneficial part of the diet culture? We started consciously thinking about food: The first step to mindful eating.

Home cooked meals, planning ahead and choosing unprocessed foods to make healthier choices every day. 

The type of diet that you eventually choose is not as important as making a conscious effort to avoid eating out and the massive health benefits that ineluctably come with that.

And that’s the biggest lesson we’ve learned so far, as far as our diets are concerned. 

The most beneficial part of the diet culture? We started consciously thinking about food: The first step to mindful eating.

Home cooked meals, planning ahead and choosing unprocessed foods to make healthier choices every day. 

The type of diet that you eventually choose is not as important as making a conscious effort to avoid eating out and the massive health benefits that ineluctably come with that. 

And that’s the biggest lesson we’ve learned so far, as far as our diets are concerned.

When life gets in the way and even those 20 minutes become a luxury, fear not! There are meal delivery services that will bring wholesome, good food to your door. Unlike the food deliveries that we were used to so far, these “healthyfied” versions of food delivery take the nutritional value of each ingredient into consideration and aspire to create nourishing, wholesome dishes to quench your hunger, guilt-free. There’s a plethora of options to harmonize with each lifestyle. Meal plans created for athletes, for weigh loss or for people with food allergies, meals for vegans and vegetarians, gluten-free or diabetes friendly, nutritionist approved and well curated to satisfy your taste profile and match your personal needs perfectly.

It’s the next best thing to home-cooked meals and it’s a very convenient solution to make your life easier when needed. But cooking at home still has no real competition, as it remains the most sustainable, wallet-friendly and healthful option that you can rely on

Research shows that people consuming home-cooked meals, improve their overall health, both mental and physical, enjoy a longer and more energized life and reinforce their social connections at the same time. 

Do we need more reasons to head to the kitchen and start cooking